Make your own free website on Tripod.com

State Highways

States also have systems in how they number their state highways. While not all states have logical systems, most will fall into several categories: Other Systems: As with everything, there are exceptions. It should be noted that not all states differentiate between primary and secondary highways, and some states seem to have no system at all.

Page 1: Arizona to Indiana
Page 2: Kentucky to Mississippi
Page 3: Missouri to South Dakota
Page 4: Virginia to Wyoming

To find out much more detailed info about numbering in a specific state, try looking at the highways page for that state.

Other State Highway Notes

Most of the time, a three digit state highway is just some sort of spur, link, or loop. However, there are MAJOR violations of this rule. The one that comes to mind immediately is CO 470, which is freeway for its entire length. This is a case where a three-digit interstate was proposed, or it existed, but the state took over, and the state highway took on the number of the three-digit interstate.

A lot of state highways get their number by being a decommissioned US highway. Decommissioning is what it's called when AASHTO decides that a certain US highway should no longer exist along a certian route, so the number is decommissioned, leaving the state to do what it wants to. Examples of US -> State decommissioning abound in every state. For example, MN 16, 61, 210, and 371 are all the old routes of US 16, 61, 210, and 371 in Minnesota.

To get more info on decommissioned US highways, go to James Sterbenz's US Route list or Robert Droz's Unofficial US Highways Page and look for the italicized routes.
 

Some Random Thoughts from E-mails

Scott "Kurumi" Oglesby:

Arizona, Indiana and Pennsylvania number most 3-digit routes as spurs off the 2-digit ones (i.e. 16 -> 116, 216, etc.) PA's 9xx routes are mostly unrelated to 2-digit routes.

Washington also does this, but as a prefix: I-82 gives you 821, 3 gives you 304, 305, etc; I-5 gives you all the 500-series numbers in its corridor.This is much better than WA's old system where Route 5 had about six different branches, all labeled route 5! I'm not kidding, that road had more than two ends.

Hawaii has sort of a Washington system going; Maui has roads in the 30's and 300's for example.

Hawaii and Florida have 4-digit roads that follow the 2- and 3-digit roads. You've seen 9336 in Florida, but there's also some 2000-series routes.

Some states have more numbered highways than others, and many skip a lot of numbers. This table shows the highest and lowest route numbers in each state and province. If there is more than one number in a box, then there could be a letter suffix or secondary highway system.
 
 
Lowest
Highest
Interstates
H1, 5
990
U.S. Routes
1
730
Alabama
   
Alaska
1
11
Arizona
 51
587
Arkansas
1
 
California
1
905
Colorado
1
470
Connecticut
2
919
Delaware
1
896
Florida
1
9336
Georgia
1
 
Hawaii
 
 
Idaho
1
200
Illinois
1
394
Indiana
1
933
Iowa
1
982
Kansas
1
 
Kentucky
1
 
Louisiana
 
 
Maine
3
238
Maryland
2
996
Massachusetts
2
295
Michigan
1
247
Minnesota
1
610
Mississippi
 
 
Missouri
1
765
Montana
 
 
Nebraska
 1
370
Nevada
 28
895
New Hampshire
 4
286
New Jersey
 
 
New Mexico
 
 
New York
 
 
North Carolina
 1
 
North Dakota
 
 
Ohio
 2
 
Oklahoma
 
 
Oregon
 
 
Pennsylvania
 
 
Rhode Island
 
 
South Carolina
 
 
South Dakota
 
 
Tennessee
 
 
Texas
1
 
Utah
 
 
Vermont
 
 
Virginia
 
 
Washington
 
 
West Virginia
 
 
Wisconsin
 
 
Wyoming
 
789
Newfoundland
 1
 
Nova Scotia
 1
395
Prince Edward Island
 1
358
New Brunswick
 1
970 
Quebec
 5
 
Ontario
 3
811 
Manitoba
 1
 
Saskatchewan
 1
 
Alberta
 1
 
British Columbia
 1
 
Northwest Terr.
 1
 
Yukon Terr.
 1
 

Links | Home